ROBERT SCHENKKAN

PULITZER PRIZE-WINNING PLAYWRIGHT & SCREENWRITER

Done Deal

Dallas — “Any jackass can kick a barn down, but it takes a carpenter to build one,” says Lyndon Baines Johnson, reflecting on a southern Democrat intent on hijacking the 36th president’s push to pass a Civil Rights bill.

LBJ tells it like it is. He also knows the carpenter has to saw and hammer the wood—or whatever else needs shaping—to build anything. Pondering on all the sweet-talk, wheedling and ruthless deal-making it takes to leverage the forces of power to create a better world, he goes on: “Nothin’ comes free. Nothin'." Not even good,” he says, staring into the distance." To read more, click here.

BWW Review: Playhouse Stages a Large Scale ALL THE WAY

"I am in blood stepped in so far that should I wade no more, / Returning were as tedious as go o'er," says Macbeth in William Shakespeare's tragedy of the same name. I have always felt that these lines could have described President Lyndon Johnson as he doggedly followed his disastrous course in Vietnam." To read more, click here.

Robert Schenkkan's All the Way Begins Rehearsals for Arena Stage Run

Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater celebrated the first day of rehearsal for its production of Robert Schenkkan's Tony Award-winning All the Way. The production, which is set to run April 1-May 8, will be directed in the round by Kyle Donnelly. To read more, click here.

New play ‘All the Way’ examines LBJ’s presidency, race issues

"All the Way," opening March 3 at the Wyly Theatre, examines the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson and issues of race in America in the 1960s. Dallas Theater Center. To read more, click here

All the Way' captures complicated realities of LBJ's tenure

"All the Way" at the Alley Theatre registers as an event on several counts. First and foremost, it marks the powerful Houston premiere of Robert Schenkkan's engrossing drama about Lyndon B. Johnson's tumultuous first year in the White House - one of the most deserving "best play" Tony winners of recent years." To read more, click here.

Arena Stage Announces Full Casting for D.C. Premiere of All the Way

"Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater has announced complete casting for its upcoming Washington, D.C. premiere of Robert Schenkkan's Tony Award-winning All the Way. The production, which is set to run April 1-May 8, will be directed in the round by Kyle Donnelly." To read more, click here.

'All the Way' makes riveting drama of LBJ presidency

"Politics as a rule abounds in high drama - but few chapters in America's political history have been as explosively dramatic as President Lyndon B. Johnson's tumultuous first year in the White House. That's the genius of Robert Schenkkan's Tony-winning "All the Way," which makes its eagerly awaited Houston premiere this week at the Alley Theatre - the first-ever co-production between Houston's Alley and the Dallas Theatre Center, where it will play following its Houston engagement." To read more, click here.

Bryan Cranston talks about bringing LBJ to life in HBO's 'All the Way'

To prepare for his latest role, Bryan Cranston was in luck: He sort of looks like former President Lyndon B. Johnson. "Fortunately my own natural makeup is what every man hopes for -- beady eyes and thin lips," Cranston, the former "Breaking Bad" star, joked to reporters at the Television Critics Assn. media tour in Pasadena on Thursday. "That's what I share with LBJ." To read more, click here.

All the Way’: Bryan Cranston Talks Revisiting LBJ For HBO Movie

"Bryan Cranston spent six months on stage in 2014 giving a tour-de-force performance as President Lyndon B. Johnson in “All the Way.” But adapting the play by Robert Schenkkan for an HBO telepic gave the actor a chance to go even deeper into under the skin of the commander-in-chief who reigned at a turbulent time for the country." To read more, click here.

How LBJ Play ‘All The Way’ Went From Broadway To HBO – TCA

hen it came to transferring Robert Schenkkan’s All The Way about President Lyndon B. Johnson, executive producer Steven Spielberg gave the writer and director Jay Roach one big note when adapting the play to the small screen: “Commit to the quiet moments,” remembered Roach. To read more, click here.

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